How Does A Person Develop Meth Addiction?

Meth is a stimulant drug and is a very common source of addiction among drugs. Meth, which is short for methamphetamine, was first synthesized in Japan during the late 1800s. Its crystal form, the most common form used by addicts, was created around 1919. Meth, being a stimulant drug, temporarily increases energy and attentiveness and decreases anxiety and hunger. Due to these short-term seemingly positive and desirable effects, meth was distributed to the serving German military personnel during World War II. However, it is likely that meth users may end up in addiction rehab programs.

Following the end of World War II, meth saw limited medical use in the 1950s. This was for similar reasons as those of the Germans. However, by the 1960s, the trade-offs had become more apparent. It was confirmed to be a highly addictive drug with multiple side effects. These heavily outweighed the short-term benefits for which it was usually prescribed.

Methamphetamine has the effect of increasing the brain reward system. This means that when it is taken, the brain associates every good feeling with the drug. As a result, the person is led to the conclusion that for more good feelings, they need to consume the drug. This leads to abuse, and because it is addictive, it soon leads to addiction.

The life of a person with meth addiction is affected in many ways, such as the following:

  • Their life is controlled by their addiction.
  • They have to hide their addiction from their family and friends.
  • They are always planning their lives around being able to get their next dose
  • They are always making excuses for why they need to borrow money and eventually run out of money from legal sources to feed their addiction.
  • They begin to do illegal acts that they would never have considered because they are controlled by their meth addiction.
  • They make excuses about their always seeming to be sick.
  • They start associating with other addicts because they don’t feel that they are being judged.
  • They know that if they continue with their addiction, they will end up like the other addicts they have seen.
  • They know that they are trapped but see no way to escape the trap.

The negative side effects of meth kick in as fast as one gets addicted. It leads to an increased sense of euphoria, increased irritability, aggression, and paranoia. All the start almost immediately, in the short term, and they will last as long as there is the continued use of the drug.

Today meth is commonly consumed as a party drug due to feelings of high social confidence. It is ingested using a variety of methods; swallowed, snorted, injected, and smoked. The most common form of the drug is the crystalline form that is known by a trio of names street meth/crystal meth / simply meth. This crystalline form is very toxic and addictive. These factors contribute heavily to the medium to long time side effects of the drug.

The effects include brain damage, and this is more so than any of the other known part drugs. It leads to similar effects of strokes, Alzheimer’s, and epilepsy. Addicts also suffer from considerable weight loss.

The majority of the medium to long-term side effects of the drug are irreversible. Meth destroys the body irreparably, and because of this, addicts should seek recovery before it is too late.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.